EQuS Chief Investigator named Australian Academy of Science Fellow

EQuS Chief Investigator Professor Halina-Rubinsztein-Dunlop has been named among the 21 new Australia Academy of Science Fellows announced in Canberra this morning. 

Professor Rubinsztein-Dunlop is recognised internationally for her achievements in laser physics, linear and nonlinear high resolution spectroscopy, laser micromanipulation, atom cooling and trapping and nano-optics.

She is one of the originators of laser enhanced ionisation spectroscopy, and is a pioneer of laser micromanipulation and transfer of angular momentum of light and all optical drive micromechanics. She initiated the experimental programs in laser micromanipulation and atom optics at the University of Queensland that culminated in the demonstration of dynamical tunnelling in a Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC) in a modulated standing wave. She led the team that observed dynamical tunnelling in quantum chaotic systems.

Academy of Science President, Professor Andrew Holmes, congratulated all of the new Fellows elected this year for making significant and lasting impacts in their scientific disciplines.

“The breadth of scientific talent recognised in this year’s election is truly awe-inspiring. From breakthroughs in pure science to spurring scientific innovations, these new Fellows have made an impact on everything from the way we treat disease to how we grow our food to advancing our fundamental knowledge about the world in which we live,” Professor Holmes said.

New Fellows will be admitted to the Academy in a formal ceremony today in Canberra, and will make presentations about their work tomorrow at the Academy’s annual flagship event, Science at the Shine Dome.

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Australian Research Council